Wicked Tasty Wicked Tasty Wicked Tasty

Wicked Tasty

Empirical

NEW
Wicked Tasty
FLAVOR NOTES

Citrus, Pine, Malt, Caramel, Balanced

BEER STYLE

East Coast Style IPA

ABV

6%

IBUS

60

QUANTITY

Availability: In Stock

    Deposit + $0.05
  • Club Price $14.99
  • Price $19.99

DESCRIPTION

A well balanced, malt-driven IPA with Citrus and Pine tones

Wicked Tasty is a slightly darker, more robust IPA with all the added lusciousness of a malt profile that accentuates and compliments the hops, instead of just getting out of the way.  Deep copper in color, with a decadent mouthfeel, this beer boasts caramel tones with a touch of graham cracker and the fresh pop of American Hops. Citrus and pine highlights all surrounding a malt backbone that provides structure and balance to the generous malt profile.  

For Wicked Tasty we wanted to pay homage to one of the original styles of IPA before IPA had coasts.  When setting out to make an East Coast IPA our first thought was, “We need to show the world what balance really is.” As a result, we decided to wrap American Hops delicately around a deep core of base malts specialty malts to showcase balance as opposed to just the juicy elements.  This is a beer that would be right at home in the hands of a New Englander fifteen years ago proclaiming exuberantly, “That’s Wicked Tasty!” 

This beer aches for the grill.  A lemon and herb-crusted pork tenderloin showcasing rosemary and thyme with just a touch of char will have you begging for seconds.  A beautiful pairing for a malt-driven IPA screams for nice, crumbly Scottish Cheddar. To line this up on the sweeter side, carrot cake with cream cheese frosting will be the perfect way to end a meal. 

 

STYLE NOTES

East Coast IPAs are balanced, often malt sweetness with citrus and fruity hop character with a nice little hop bitterness to kick you in the pants. East Coast IPAs are basically the red-headed step child of a British IPA, and it makes sense just based on geographical influence. When craft beer started to gain popularity in America, East Coast brewers sought after the tradition of European ales and lagers.